Random Analytica

Charts, Infographics & Analytics. No Spinning the Data. No Juking the Stats

Random Analytica: Australia tour of South Africa – First Chance Average (FCA)

The Australian cricket team are touring South Africa from late February to early April 2018.

For the history of the game a batters average has been calculated on their final score. In 2014 I developed the First Chance Average (FCA) which looks at Earned Runs and then First Chance Runs. The FCA complements the standard average and is calculated using the score the batter would have got if a legitimate chance had been taken by the opposing team. In the past few weeks I have been improving the metric and putting together my first comprehensive analysis using the Australian touring side of South Africa.

I am in the process of writing a detailed post on how the FCA works and will link it shortly.

Here is a look at the First Chance Averages of the 2018 Australian squad touring South Africa. I’ll be updating the charts as the tour progresses (see UPDATES).

CAMERON BANCROFT180312_CameronBancroft

PRE-TOUR: Cameron Bancroft commenced the tour with a standard average of 25.57 and under a bit of a cloud with Richard Hinds suggesting that Matt Renshaw might have earned a recall. Prior to South Africa his last score was a duck against England (2018) and in the preceeding eight innings he had not recorded a legitimate chance.

DURBAN: Scores of 5 & 53 with no chances. PORT ELIZABETH: Scores of 38 & 24. Cameron has now had 12 test innings without giving the opposition a single chance. His FCA continues to remain aligned to his standard average.

PAT CUMMINS180312_PatCummins

PRE-TOUR: Pat Cummins returns to South Africa (after a long break) with a pretty solid standard average of 27.60 and an FCA of 19.17 (with three chances). Prior to Durban his last score was 24* against England (Sydney, 2018).

DURBAN: Scores of 3 and 26 with no chances. PORT ELIZABETH: A golden duck then 5.

JOSH HAZELWOOD180312_JoshHazelwood

PRE-TOUR: Josh Hazelwood started the tour with 274-runs, a standard average of 11.91 and an FCA of 9.39 (with four chances). At the end of the Ashes he had recorded 17-not outs in 40-innings (42.5%). His last score prior to the tour was 1* against England (Melbourne, 2017).

DURBAN: Scores of 2* & 9* with no chances. With those scores he now has 19 not-outs from 42-innings (45.2%). PORT ELIZABETH: 10* and then 17 in 17-balls.

USMAN KHAWAJA180312_UsmanKhawaja


Bancroft vs. Renshaw might have been the cricket conversation prior to tour commencing in South Africa but I had a thought that Usman Khawaja might be the batter in trouble.

Usman Khawaja commenced the tour with a healthy standard average of 45.80 but his First Chance Average was a much lower 34.96 after nine-chances. He has scored 1,608 Earned Runs with a volatility of22.0% which is extremely high. His last score was 171 against England (Sydney, 2018) BUT his 2017 year was very ordinary.

FCA stats for 2017: 129 Earned Runs. Four Chances plus 127 First Chance Runs with a volatility of 49.6%.

One to watch.

DURBAN: Disappointing start with a 14, then 6 in the second innings while reverse sweeping? PORT ELIZABETH: First innings score of 4 but a tough chance was put down when still on a duck (Earned Runs then = 0). In the second innings Usman grafted out a score of 75 without a chance. Enough done to lock him in for the rest of the tour.

NATHAN LYON180312_NathanLyon

PRE-TOUR: Nathan commenced the tour with standard average of 11.61 and a FCA of 11.14 after just five chances. His pre-tour volatility is a miserly 2.5% which means he looks after his wicket either as a tailender or as the night watchman which he gets promoted to consistently. Prior to South Africa his last score was 29 against England (Melbourne, 2017).

DURBAN: 1st innings score of 12 after being dropped on two, then a second innings score of two after being dropped on one. Prior to Durban Nathan had not presented a chance to the opposition since he was caught but not given out in Port Elizabeth way back in February 2014. PORT ELIZABETH: A first innings score of 17 then 5.

MITCHELL MARSH180312_MitchellMarsh

PRE-TOUR: Mitchell commenced the tour with standard average of 29.24 and no chances, thus no FCA after 39-innings. Prior to South Africa his last score was 101, his second century against England (Sydney, 2018).

DURBAN: Scores of 96 and 6 with one chance in the 1st innings, a tough one while on 42. PORT ELIZABETH: Sick as a dog Mitchell scored 4 in the first innings and then 45 in the second.

SHAUN MARSH180312_ShaunMarsh

PRE-TOUR: Shaun commenced the tour averaging 40.87 (standard) and 29.69 (FCA) after nine chances. It should be noted that his Earned Run volatility is a high 25.8% but that has been reducing as he put together some solid scores during 2017. Prior to South Africa his last score was 156 against England (Sydney, 2018).

DURBAN: Shaun commenced the tour with solid scores of 40 & 33 with no chances. PORT ELIZABETH: Scores of 24 & 1.

TIM PAINE180312_TimPaine

PRE-TOUR: Tim’s chart should be viewed in two parts with four tests in 2010 then a long break to 2017. He commenced the tour averaging 39.92 (standard) and 30.67 (FCA) after two chances in 2010. His high score of 92 came after two drops (0 & 86) thus his FCA high score is his more recent 57. Prior to South Africa his last score was 38* against England (Sydney, 2018).

DURBAN: Scores of 25 & 14. PORT ELIZABETH: A decent last partnership knock of 36 in the 1st innings and then 28* in the second.


PRE-TOUR: Steve Smith is the real deal. He commenced the tour with an impressive standard average of 63.76 and a FCA of 54.67 (with 19-chances). Prior to South Africa his last score was 83 against England (Sydney, 2018).

DURBAN: Scores of 56 and 38 including a tough chance in the 1st innings when he was 47. PORT ELIZABETH: Scores of 25 and 11. Interestingly his scores since Melbourne without the FCA are in an almost perfect decline, that is 102*; 83, 56, 38, 25 & 11.

MITCHELL STARC180312_MitchellStarc

PRE-TOUR: Mitchell Starc is the big hitting bowler who can bat on occassion. He commenced the tour with a standard average of 23.15 and a FCA of 18.78 after 9-chances. Prior to South Africa his last score was 11 against England (Sydney, 2018).

DURBAN: Scores of 35 & 7. PORT ELIZABETH: Scores of 8 & 1.

DAVID WARNER180312_DavidWarner

PRE-TOUR: David Warner commenced the tour with impressive averages of 48.78 (standard) and 40.61 (FCA) with 23-chances to-date. He has scored 989 first chance runs (15.9%) which is high but reflective of the openers position he has held for the majority of his test career. Prior to South Africa his last score was 56 against England (Sydney, 2018).

DURBAN: Solid start with scores of 53 & 28 and no chances. PORT ELIZABETH: 63 in the first innings (and was looking in good shape too) then 13.



1/03/2018: (1st Session) Added Cameron Bancroft (5). (2nd Session) – Added Steve Smith (56)
2/03/2018: (1st Session) Added Pat Cummins (3). (2nd Session) Added Josh Hazelwood (2*).
5/03/2018: Updated Cameron Bancroft (53); Steve Smith (38); Pat Cummins (26) & Josh Hazelwood (9*). Added Mitchell Marsh (FC-42/96 & 6).
6/03/2018: Added David Warner (51 & 28).
7/03/2018: Updated charts to include NO* data. Added Usman Khawaja (14 & 6).
9/03/2018: Added Shaun Marsh (40 & 33). Updated Cameron Bancroft (38); Usman Khawaja (FC-0/4); David Warner (63); Steve Smith (25); Shaun Marsh (24); Mitchell Marsh (4); Pat Cummins (0) & Josh Hazelwood (10*).
10/03/2018: Updated charts to include a volatility direction. Added Tim Paine (25, 14 & 36).
11/03/2018: Added Mitchell Starc (35, 7 & 8).
12/03/2018: Updated 2nd Innings scores including David Warner (13); Cameron Bancroft (24); Steve Smith (11); Shaun Marsh (1) & Usman Khawaja (75). Added Nathan Lyon (FC-2/12, FC-1/2 & 17). Updated 2nd innings scores of Mitchell Marsh (45); Pat Cummins (5); Nathan Lyon (5); Josh Hazelwood (17) & Tim Paine (28*).

Random Analytica: The United States of Violence

Two must read stories this week. CNN have listed the top mass shootings in the US since 1949 and The New York Times put together a thoughtful piece on how the shooters were able to obtain their weapons.

After the Port Arthur massacre in 1996 where 35 were killed by a deranged shooter Australia introduced sweeping gun control laws and removed access to military grade weapons. Since that time we have not had one mass shooting incident yet the United States of America continues to have mass shootings and the body counts are escalating.

It is my very strong view that civilians don’t need military grade weapons, bump stocks and silencers. Full-stop.

For my part I have put together an infographic on the nine worst mass shootings by an individual in the United States since 1949 which now includes the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shootings and highlights the array of military grade weapons utilised by the perpetrators.

Each weapon represents those killed.

This is done in solidarity with the kids of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School who are peacefully protesting against the gun culture in America today. I hope for their sake that they rid American streets of military grade weapons and end the culture mass shootings.


Random Analytica: Most Cumulative Time In Space

I was in a discussion with the kids over the weekend over who had spent the most time in space. Astronaut Peggy Whitson broke a number of records for Team USA late last year but interestingly the board is stacked with Soviets, then Russians who comprise 90% of the top-10 and 80% of the top-50 given they have operated space stations since 1971 (starting with Salyut-1).

That discussion turned into a quick Top-10 chart.


Note: M1-M6 represents separate mission flight times. The Soviet Union flag has been used for those cosmonauts who were accepted into the space program prior to 1991.

Random Analytica: Dow Jones Industrial Average closes down 1,032-points (-4.15%)

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 1,032-points overnight. This marks the second time in history that Index has closed down more than 1,000-points in a single day and is the second worst point’s on record. Although not even close to the worst day historically it does signal a surge in volatility that is spooking investors. Here is the updated chart.


Some analysis via the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Dow Jones plunges over 1,000 points as Wall Street and European sell-off deepens. Excerpt:

The blue-chip Dow Jones index closed 4.15 per cent lower at 23,860. In the final hour of trade, the S&P 500’s and Nasdaq’s losses deepened to 3.75 and 3.9 per cent respectively. The Dow and S&P are in correction territory, having fallen by more than 10 per cent since January 26, when they hit record highs.”

“The dust hasn’t settled yet, and I think both buyers and sellers are trying to figure out what this market really wants to do,” said Jonathan Corpina, Meridian Equity Partners’ senior managing partner. “I would think that this continues to happen for the next few trading sessions for everything to kind of get flushed out.”

Every S&P sector posted losses, with financials (-4.3pc), technology (-4.3pc) and consumer cyclicals (-3.9pc) being the worst performers. US market volatility jumped by 27 per cent overnight, with CBOE’S volatility index (VIX) rising to 35.17. The measure for market anxiety has more than doubled since last Friday — prior to the mass sell-off when the VIX index was at the relatively low 14.3

Furthermore, the London, Paris and Frankfurt indexes tumbled overnight, with falls between 1.5 and 2.5 per cent. During the European session, the Bank of England voted unanimously to keep British interest rates on hold. But the UK central bank warned rates may need to rise sooner, and by more than it had previously expected, due to an improving global economy.

Random Analytica: Dow Jones Industrial Average closes up 567-points (+2.3%)

A lot of talk yesterday about the big losses experienced on Wall Street with the Dow Jones down 1,175-points, the first time that index has declined by more than 1,000-points in a single day.

Crash, tumble and wipe-out were utilised frequently across news channels and social media. The #TrumpSlump hashtag was overutilised by many who really don’t understand markets.

In relative terms yesterday’s Dow Jones numbers were not the worst day of historical trading although they did break the previous point’s loss record. In fact, it didn’t even rate in the top 100 of trading day points losses. My thoughts are here along with a couple of charts.

Today the conversation is all about volatility as the Dow Jones returned almost half of yesterday’s losses.

In fact, the Dow Jones Industrial Average had its 4th best day on record (in terms of points gained). Here is the updated top 20 chart.


To get within ‘coo-wee’ of needing to update the Biggest One-Day % Gains chart we would need a +7% increase which would equate to an approximate 1,750-point gain in a single day.

With volatility returning to the markets we might get more updates to this chart in coming weeks.

Random Analytica: Dow Jones Industrial Average closes down 1,175-points (-4.6%)

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed down 1,175.21 points overnight losing 4.6% of its value in one-day of trading. That is the single worst day in terms of points but is it the worst day ever?

The simple answer is NO. In fact it doesn’t even rate in the top 20!

Here are a couple of charts to prove that point.


In terms of points the Dow Jones Industrial Average did have its worst day on record. The previous record was a loss of 777.68 points on the 29th September 2008 at the height of the Global Recession.

Here is a look at the top-20 worst losses as a percentage which is the more accurate reflection of yesterday’s trading day in the United States.


In terms of percentage the Dow Jones Industrial Average did not have its worst day ever. In fact, yesterday’s trading losses do not even rate in the top 20 worst days on record.

Black Monday was the worst day on record. Here is a reminder of what that headline looks like. Via the Australian Broadcasting Commission. No, this wasn’t the worst day on the Dow Jones — we’ve seen worse. Excerpt:

October 19, 1987

Known as Black Monday in America, this was the day that 22.61 per cent was lost from the Dow Jones. This was followed by Black Tuesday in Australia, when the ASX plunged a massive 25 per cent in response.


Photo: Front page of the Sydney Morning Herald, 21st October 1987, the day after the stock market crash via the Australian Broadcasting Commission.

Big technical stock exchange losses make for great headlines. The Dow Jones Industrial Average had a bad day and the Australian Stock Exchange is following that lead in response but it’s not the worst day ever.

Not even close.

Random Analytica: Guantanamo Detainees 2009 – 2018

Ian Bremmer, the President of the Eurasia Group sent out an interesting tweet yesterday which highlighted the amount of detainees held by the US Military at Guantanamo Bay since 2009. Interestingly there were 214 detainees held at the prison in 2009 when then President Obama ordered the facility closed. Today there are still 41 detainees including Hambali who is accused of orchestrating the 2002 Bali Bombings and has still not faced trial.


The New York Times has an excellent interactive project site with all the details and is well-worth a look. The Guantanamo Docket. Overview:

About the Project

The Guantánamo Docket is an interactive database of documents and analysis from The New York Times about the roughly 780 men who have been detained at Guantánamo as enemy combatants since January 2002.

The Times has reviewed thousands of pages of government documents released in recent years, as well as court records and news media reports from around the world. The Times will update the database with ongoing research.

There are three types of documents in the database:

Combatant Status Review Tribunals

The database includes Pentagon documents related to the Combatant Status Review Tribunals, military hearings created in response to a 2004 decision by the United States Supreme Court to judge whether prisoners at Guantánamo were properly designated as enemy combatants and subject to indefinite detention. The hearings took place from July 2004 to March 2005.

Administrative Review Boards

The database also includes documents from subsequent Administrative Review Boards, panels of military officers conducting annual hearings to determine whether the detainees remain a threat to the United States or its allies.

These documents, along with the documents related to the Combatant Status Review Tribunals, were selected for public disclosure by the U.S. Defense Department in 2006 in response to a lawsuit brought under the Freedom of Information Act by The Associated Press.

Joint Task Force Assessments

The database also includes a selection of classified documents from the Guantánamo Joint Task Force, part of a huge trove of secret documents leaked last year to the anti-secrecy organization WikiLeaks. They were made available to The Times by another source on the condition of anonymity. The files contain the government’s assessment of the dangers the individuals represent. The files are dated from February 2002 to January 2009, and some of the information may have been superseded by later, still undisclosed assessments made during the Obama administration or by more highly classified documents.

The documents contain the Defense Department’s assessments of the detainees, some of which have been challenged in federal court, and in some of the cases lower court judges have ruled against evidence presented by the government. Those cases have been appealed.

In June 2013, the Justice Department released a list showing who of the remaining Guantánamo detainees has been recommended for transfer, prosecution or continued detention without trial. The list, released under the Freedom of Information Act, represents the final recommendations of a task force of national-security agencies President Obama put together in 2009 as part of his unfulfilled pledge to close the prison within a year. The group issued a report in early 2010, but its individual recommendations were not included in that document.

Lastly, a copy of the tweet by Ian Bremmer which kicked off the idea for the infographic.



13 Feb 2018: Amended first paragraph to include Hambali story.


Random Analytica: Rift Valley Fever 2000 to January 21, 2018

Over the African summer there have been several small outbreaks of Rift Valley Fever in both South Sudan and Uganda. In Yirol East, Eastern Lakes District in South Sudan an outbreak has resulted in six confirmed cases with three deaths. In Uganda there have been five cases spread over a wide area in that countries cattle corridor resulting in five cases and four deaths.

Here are the key facts about Rift Valley Fever via the World Health Organisation (updated July 2017).

  • • Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a viral zoonosis that primarily affects animals but can also infect humans.
  • • The majority of human infections result from contact with the blood or organs of infected animals.
  • • Human infections have also resulted from the bites of infected mosquitoes.
  • • To date, no human-to-human transmission of RVF virus has been documented.
  • • The incubation period (the interval from infection to onset of symptoms) for RVF varies from 2 to 6 days.
  • • Outbreaks of RVF in animals can be prevented by a sustained programme of animal vaccination.

While most human cases are relatively mild, a small percentage of patients develop a much more severe form of the disease. This usually appears as 1 or more of 3 distinct syndromes: ocular (eye) disease (0.5–2% of patients), meningoencephalitis (less than 1% of patients) or haemorrhagic fever (less than 1% of patients).

According to WHO, since 2000 there have been 15 significant outbreaks of Rift Valley Fever which have impacted 13-countries and at least one case was exported to China.

Here is a look at the Rift Valley Fever outbreaks by country since 2000.

RiftValleyFever - 180121

NOTE: The 2007 Sudan outbreak occurred prior to the creation of South Sudan but the outbreak was limited to districts within modern day Sudan.

The latest South Sudan update via the World Health Organisation. Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR). Epidemiological Update W2 2018 (Jan 8-Jan 14). Excerpt (from page 14):

Epidemics – Update (RVF, Yirol East)

A Rift Valley Fever (RVF) outbreak reported in Thonabutkok village, Yali Payam, Yirol East county with the initial case dating back to 7 December 2017.

As of 21 January 2018, a total of 15 suspect RVF human cases have been reported in Eastern Lakes State. Out of the 15 suspect human cases reported since 7 December 2017, three human cases have been confirmed, three died and were classified as probable cases with epidemiological linkage to the three confirmed cases, four were classified as none-cases following negative laboratory results for RVF, and laboratory testing is pending for the other five suspect cases.

At the moment – field investigation (human, animal, entomological) are ongoing; supportive care to suspect cases; and social mobilisation and risk communication. Discussions on a joint Ministry of Health and Ministry of Livestock and Fisheries outbreak declaration are ongoing at the highest levels of Government.

The latest Uganda update again via the World Health Organisation. Government of Uganda confirms outbreak of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic and Rift Valley fevers. Excerpt:

The Ministry of Health in Uganda confirmed an outbreak of the Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever and Rift Valley Fever in Nakasseke and Luwero respectively.

Regarding RVF, a total of five patients including four deaths have been confirmed in this outbreak. Cases have been sporadic, with no epidemiological link, and are spread out in diverse geographical areas in the cattle corridor. This is the second time RVF cases are confirmed in Uganda.

During a press conference at the Uganda Media Centre, the Minister of Health, Dr Jane Ruth Aceng informed the media that the government has employed rapid interventions to manage and control the outbreaks. She also revealed that a National Rapid Response Team of expert epidemiologists, clinicians, veterinarians, communicators and laboratory specialists was deployed in the affected districts to establish and support the response structures.


Random Analytica: Poor record for top-3 purchases at Gold Coast Magic Millions Yearling sales

Almost every year the records for the Gold Coast Magic Millions Yearling sales are broken. This year a colt sold for $2,000,000 making it the most expensive purchase in the events history. Money spent increased for the sixth consecutive year; up by approximately $21-million on 2017 and across the entire event overall sales have increased from $75.9-million in 2010 to $180-million this month.

Ok, that’s interesting but how did the big purchases in the past decade fare? I’ve charted the two most expensive horses each year from 2010, then included the next most expensive horse that has broken even in terms of prize money only… (Adding the true cost of horse ownership is just too hard but if you are interested I would recommend reading Cuffelinks: The economic reality of breeding and owning racehorses by Garry Mackrell).


2010: Cross Of Gold was the top purchase at $925,000 and although he is still racing in Western Australia as a 9-year old gelding his 71-starts for $225,626 is well short of what connections originally hoped for. The first break-even horse was Hoylonny, who cost $380,000 but won 7-races and earned $469,330 before retiring in 2015. The stand-out horse in the first 20 was Delago Deluxe who was shipped to South Africa, won approx. 1.5M Rand (approx. $160,000) including a Group 1. He has now retired to stud duties back in Australia.

2011: Connections would still not be smiling when they bought Laughing Lad for $1,150,000 with a miserly $8,720 return. Aptly named No Looking Back was the fourth most expensive horse at $500,000 and before a quick-fire career she returned $635,250 and retired in 2014 with a ROI of 27.1%.

2012: Another tough year for buyers of thoroughbreds. Bull Point was the top purchase at $960,000 and he amassed a decent $552,000 in earnings before retiring to stud in 2016. The first break-even horse then was the 16th most expensive horse Centre Pivot who has won eight races, earned connections $718,033 and might chalk up more in the next couple of years.

2013: This was the big year for the Gold Coast Magic Millions Yearling sales when the 61st most expensive horse, Winx was picked up for $230,000. She has currently returned $15.63-million to date. The most expensive horse bought that year was Valentia who cost $1,350,000 and returned $218,800 before retiring to stud duties in 2016. The first break-even horse was another good-thing, 2016 Group 1 Emirates winner Awesome Rock who cost $575,000 (4th most expensive) but won just over $2,000,000 during his career.

2014: Red Knot was the only $1,000,000 horse in 2014 and has currently returned $125,710 without setting the world on fire. At 14th the export Campbell Junior has been winning big in Japan and has so far earned around ¥97,266,000 (approx. $1,100,000 AUD). No stand-outs currently sit between Red Knot & Campbell Junior although all twelve horses are racing.

2015: The top three only. Ready Fire Aim was bought for $1,200,000 and in 2017 won two country NSW races for total prize money of $45,090. The next two big purchases Alter Call (cost $1,050,000) and Pirapala ($850,000) have both won races but their prize money is still sub-$100,000 as they struggle through the grades. Let’s see how they race in 2018.

2016: The top purchase of 2016 was Chauffer at $1,600,000. This horse is looking the goods with $555,250 already in the kitty including a 2nd behind Houtzen at the 2017 Magic Millions 2Y Classic which earned connections $370,000. That said Chauffer still needs to win more than $1,000,000 to become the first top-3 purchase to break-even in a decade. Showtime (4th most expensive at $1,100,000) and Dracarys (5th at $1,000,000) are also showing some early signs of good form.

2017: The only two year old from last year who was purchased for more than a $1-million and is on the radar is Angel having won their maiden at Geelong.

No Looking Back and Awesome Rock, each the 4th most expensive horses in their respective years won more money than they initially cost and were good buys in the end. I find that terribly ironic given my ability to pick 4th places on a regular basis. If you bought into the three most expensive horses over the last decade then you fared poorly with none of the 22-horses returning more than they cost at this stage (with fingers crossed for Chauffer).

Best of luck!



NOTE: Gamble for the fun of it, not for the money. If it stops being fun… Stop.

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Random Analytics: Australian 44th Parliament Suspensions (the Bronwyn Bishop Era)

Tomorrow, on the first day back from the winter break the Coalition government will sit down and decide who will be the new Speaker of the Parliament after Bronwyn Bishop resigned from the role following revelations that she took a helicopter to a Liberal Party fundraiser at a cost of more than $5,000 to the tax-payer rather than choosing another, cheaper form of transport.

Here is an updated look at the charts for Parliamentary suspension during the Bronwyn Bishop era.

1 - SuspensionsBySittingDay

As Speaker of the Parliament, Bronwyn Bishop officially spent 130-days in the chair and suspended 400 Members of Parliament (the highest total on record) including 18 MPs in a single day (again, the highest on record). 393 (98.3%) of those ejections were from the ALP and seven were from the Coalition. Included in the total were six 94(b) Naming’s where MPs are suspended for 24-hours rather than just the hour as per the 94(a) suspension. They were Mark Dreyfus (twice), Wayne Swan, Ed Husic, Jim Chalmers and Andrew Laming (from the LNP). On the second 94(b) suspension for Mark Dreyfus he was suspended for the rest of the day and then a further three days.

Interestingly, during 2015 Bronwyn Bishop’s suspension average has moderated (as represented by the black line within the chart) but only slightly and it still stayed above 3 for the entire year.

Here’s a look at the Top 12 MPs who were suspended during Bronwyn Bishop’s time as Speaker of the Parliament.

2 - Top12SuspensionByMember

The Member for Wakefield, Nick Champion continues to lead the count at 53 and is currently 12 suspensions ahead of his colleague the Member for Moreton, Graham Perrett (at 41). Coalition Members who have been suspended include Ewen Jones (twice), Michael McCormack, Luke Simpkings and Andrew Nikolic (twice) and Andrew Laming (94b).

A further 27 ALP MPs have been suspended ten times (or less):

Finally, a look at how the Speakers of the Parliament have stacked up in terms of suspensions during their tenure (and no surprises on who tops the list).

3 - SuspensionsBySpeaker

On a final note the Sydney Morning Herald did a very good analysis of the 29th Speaker’s time in office which is worth a read. Bronwyn Bishop’s greatest hits (or misses) as Speaker of the Parliament. Click through for the mosaic of Bronwyn Bishop created using photos of MPs who were suspended from Parliament during her time in the chair.


Data Sources

[1] Parliament of Australia. Hansard. Accessed 9 August 2015.